Galaxy Wars: M81 versus M82

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On the top, surrounded by blue spiral arms, is spiral galaxy M81. On the bottom, marked by red gas and dust clouds, is irregular galaxy M82. This stunning vista shows these two mammoth galaxies locked in gravitational combat, as they have been for the past billion years. The gravity from each galaxy dramatically affects the other during each hundred million-year pass. Last go-round, M82’s gravity likely raised density waves rippling around M81, resulting in the richness of M81’s spiral arms. But M81 left M82 with violent star forming regions and colliding gas clouds so energetic the galaxy glows in X-rays. In a few billion years only one galaxy will remain.

Credit: Leonardo Orazi

NGC 5101 and friends

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This sharp telescopic field of view holds two bright galaxies. Barred spiral NGC 5101 (top right) and nearly edge-on system NGC 5078 are separated on the sky by about 0.5 degrees or about the apparent width of a full moon. Found within the boundaries of the serpentine constellation Hydra, both are estimated to be around 90 million light-years away and similar in size to our own large Milky Way galaxy. In fact, if they both lie at the same distance their projected separation would be only 800,000 light-years or so. That’s easily less than half the distance between the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy. NGC 5078 is interacting with a smaller companion galaxy, cataloged as IC 879, seen just below and left of the larger galaxy’s bright core. Even more distant background galaxies are scattered around the colorful field. Some are even visible right through the face-on disk of NGC 5101. But the prominent spiky stars are in the foreground, well within our own Milky Way.

Image credit & Copyright: Martin Pugh

Star Explosion

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Hubble captures incredible star explosion in four-year time-lapse video

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has been observing the V838 Mon light echo since 2002. Each new observation of the light echo reveals a new and unique “thin-section” through the interstellar dust around the star. This video morphs images of the light echo from the Hubble taken at multiple times between 2002 and 2006. The numerous whorls and eddies in the interstellar dust are particularly noticeable. Possibly they have been produced by the effects of magnetic fields in the space between the stars.

Watch a video of the full time lapse here

NGC 6520

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NGC 6520 is an open star cluster located about 5,500 light years away towards the constellation Sagittarius. It is about 10 light years across. The bright blue stars are only a few million years old, much younger than our Sun.

Blocking the light of NGC 6520 is Barnard 86, an absorption nebula and molecular cloud. It contains is filled with thick dust that obscures the star cluster. Surrounding the cluster and nebula in this image is part of the dense starscape of our own Milky Way.

Image and information from NASA.

Ghost of the Cepheus

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Ghost of the Cepheus Flare-shapes in the royal constellation Cepheus are cosmic dust clouds, faintly visible in dimly reflected starlight.They lurk at the edge of the Cepheus Flare molecular cloud complex some 1,200 light-years away. Over 2 light-years across the ghostly nebula and relatively isolated Bok globule, also known as vdB 141 or Sh2-136, is near the center of the field. The core of the dark cloud on the right is collapsing (likely a binary star system in the early stages of formation.)